Monday, June 24, 2013

Great discussions of the biblioblogs -- another request

I was delighted by the response to my post Blogging Mark - Input Requested Please.  The comments there have very much helped me to think through my paper on Mark in the digital age for the SBL International coming up soon in St Andrews.

In writing that paper, I am footnoting some good, round-up discussions of the blogs and blogging in our area, and I am keen to get some links in to a range of good discussions, and not just repeating my own boring stuff.  What I am thinking of are those posts that reflect critically on the successes and failures of the biblioblogging phenomenon over the last decade or so.  My footnote currently reads (and please excuse the ugly formatting because it's pasted from a horrible old MS Word document):
For reflections on the history and development of blogs in this area, see especially James R. Davila, Assimilated to the Blogosphere: Blogging Ancient Judaism, SBL Forum , April 2005, http://sbl-site.org/Article.aspx?ArticleID=390; “Enter the Bibliobloggers,” University of St Andrews School of Divinity Website, November 2005, http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/divinity/rt/otp/abstracts/enterthebibliobloggers/, and “What Just Happened: The rise of biblioblogging in the first decade of the twenty-first century”, 2010 Annual Meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature in Atlanta, http://paleojudaica.blogspot.co.uk/2010_11_14_archive.html#1715486029034288246.  See also Mark Goodacre, “Pods, blogs and other time-wasters,” NT Blog, 17 November 2011, http://ntweblog.blogspot.com/2011/11/pods-blogs-and-other-time-wasters.html.
In other words, at this point, it's just Jim and me.  What other nice round-up reflective posts on the biblioblogging phenomenon should I add?  Thanks for your help.  This is a great example of the communal internet and the joys of horizontal blogging!

13 comments:

Mike K said...

One of the volumes of the journal "Bulletin for the Study of Religion" was largely devoted to Biblioblogging (https://www.equinoxpub.com/journals/index.php/BSOR/issue/view/730) and there is also Crossley's ideological analyses in his books.

Mark Goodacre said...

Perfect! Thanks, Mike. How did I forget that?! Once again, a fine proof of how blogging makes research easier!

.............. said...

Not really a link, but James Crossley's discusses bloggers in his Jesus in an Age of Neoliberalism... I talk a bit out it here:
http://historicaljesusresearch.blogspot.com/2012/11/crossley-confesses-that-he-is-not-wrong.html

-anthony

Mark Goodacre said...

Thanks, Anthony. Yes, I should read Crossley's latest. Enjoyed your blogposts on it. Unlike you, I didn't get a pristine copy in the post from Equinox. I did write an extended critique of his take on bloggers from the previous volume.

Deane said...

I compiled a round-up of the blog-published papers and podcasts from the inaugural session of the SBL Blogger and Online Publication Section, which might be helpful. See Biblical Studies Carnival נז (November 2010), second paragraph. I just checked most of the links, and they still work.

Mark Goodacre said...

Thanks, Deane. Very helpful. I'll add that to the paper tonight.

James McGrath said...

I was going to mention the BSOR issue - I don't know about other articles from it, but mine is online on my Selected Works page, if you need to see it. My 2010 SBL presentation is also on there. Here's a link:

http://works.bepress.com/do/search/?q=blog&start=0&context=680515


Mark Hoffman said...

The now defunct biblioblogs.com by Brandon Wason and John Hobbins used to do a biblioblogger of the month interview. They did about 50 of them. (And you were one of them...) It's still available on internet archive - http://wayback.archive.org/web/20090610064947/http://www.biblioblogs.com/featured-blogs/

David Mackinder said...

Cory Taylor has an interesting sociological analysis of biblioblogging -- http://exlibris1.wordpress.com/2012/11/26/the-sociology-of-biblioblogging/

Mark Goodacre said...

Thanks, James. That's helpful.

Mark Goodacre said...

Thanks, Mark. Gosh, I hadn't realized or had forgotten that biblioblogs.com had vanished. That's a sizeable archive of stuff there. Re-read my own interview on wayback machine and although some of the formatting has been mashed, it's funny seeing what I thought back then, e.g. I say that top brass like Larry Hurtado would "never" blog!

Mark Goodacre said...

Many thanks, David. That's a good read.

Josh said...

Proving the power of crowdsourcing! This is a nice example of it.